My autistic child is not ignoring you - he is waiting for you to enter his world

My autistic child is not ignoring you - he is waiting for you to enter his world

A few years back Jude spent most of his time at home disengaged. Often it felt like he was trying to avoid me, leaving the room when I’d try to go and play with him. He found it difficult to look anywhere near me, let alone make eye contact. It felt like he spent most of his time ignoring me.

Jude would spend his day tapping objects, windows, walls, radiators; anything that made a good sound. I’d have given anything to snap him out of it, and come and play with me, with a ball, a balloon, look at a book, anything but tap everything!

Then I got given probably the most valuable piece of advice I’ve had so far about autism:

Stop trying to force Jude to enter my world, and join him in his.

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