An illustrated children's story about it being ok to be different

An illustrated children's story about it being ok to be different

Book Summary

Description

This illustrated children's story explains what it feels like to be a child who is different from other children. Charley seems to keep getting into trouble all the time for doing things wrong. While not labelled in the story, Charley has a specific learning difficulty. In particular, he shows dyspraxic tendencies such as clumsiness. It is Charley's specific learning difficulty that makes him feel different and therefore unhappy at school, because he doesn't understand it. Thankfully, when Charley learns he is not alone, things begin to get better for him. This book can be used with young children to discuss how neurodiversity (e.g. dyspraxia, dyslexia, ADHD and Asperger's Syndrome) is not a bad thing and that in fact it can have its strengths.

Format

2nd Edition paperback published Jan 2017
50 pages
Colourful illustrations on every page

RRP

8.99 GBP
10.99 EUR
11.99 USD

Audience

Aimed at 6-8 year olds
Years 2 to 3 in Key Stage 1-2 in the UK
Grades 1 to 2 in the US

The Blurb

Charley always seemed to get into trouble, though he didn't mean to.

He was getting fed up of going to school because he felt different than most of the other kids.

Then he met his Aunty Bella, and everything changed.

Book Objectives

This book has been written from the point of view of a child called Charley who feels unhappy at school because he keeps getting into trouble. However, Charley has a specific learning difficulty (the book was written by a dyspraxic lady, but the story holds true for all specific learning difficulties).

This illustrated book helps parents, teachers, and other adults who support children, have a non-threatening discussion about specific learning difficulties with children of primary school age. Children find it easier to relate to, and discuss, the character in the story rather than have all the attention focused on them.

Using the book as a catalyst for discussion, adults can use the illustrated story at home or in school with children who have a specific learning difficulty, or exhibit tendencies of one. Teachers can use the book to help classmates better understand their peers who may struggle with some things others don't (e.g. as illustrated by Charley's clumsiness in this story). Similarly, parents can use the book to help children better understand family members.

Book Background

You're So Clumsy Charley was originally published under the Funky Gerbil imprint in 2013. This Second Edition has had a change of typeface, along with the inclusion of some additional information. This edition has been moved over to the Your Stories Matter imprint (under the same publisher).

Charley was written and illustrated by someone who is herself dyspraxic, and is based on both her own and her daughter's experiences of being misunderstood. She wanted to help those children who continue to remain misunderstood.

As with all of its books, the publisher - Your Stories Matter – aims to help people know they are not alone with what makes them different. If a young person or adult can relate to a story, it gives them hope and encourages them to share their concerns. The publisher aims to provide free teaching resources for all of its books that can be used in schools, to help improve understanding and celebrate differences.

Book Reviews

The reviews below were kindly received prior to publication. But if you would like to leave a review, that would be amazing! The following are great places to leave book reviews (with direct links to the book!): Goodreadsamazon.co.ukamazon.com and Google Books

Every primary school and library should have a copy of this book to ensure that the 16% of children believed to have dyspraxic/dyslexic learning profiles retain their self-esteem.
— North East Lancashire Dyslexia Association (NELDA)
A simple but thought provoking book on a child who is different, getting the child to focus on what he can do rather than what he can’t. A good book which will stimulate debate between adult and children who have difficulties in coping with being different.
— Dyspraxia Foundation UK (review of First Edition)
A vibrant story book, full of pictures for you to share with your child. A very positive tale. It might open up many conversations about how your child feels having Dyspraxia and comfort them to know that they are not the only one to have it. A badly needed Dyspraxia book for children.
— www.fantasticdyspraxic.co.uk

Book Resources

Currently under development

Book Availability

Most bookshops throughout the English-speaking world and of course Amazon. Contact us for a discount if you are an educational or support organisation wishing to purchase in bulk for resale or otherwise.

Paul Johnson

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So You Think You Know About ADHD

A story told from the point of view of a child wanting to know more about how dyspraxia and SPD affects her sister

A story told from the point of view of a child wanting to know more about how dyspraxia and SPD affects her sister